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Why Max Clifford hates David Cameron, why Wayne Rooney’s callgirl likes me, and why Mark Lawson is right about culture

Posted on 30 May 2011 | 12:05pm

I hope I’m not giving away Nicky Campbell’s trade secrets when I reveal that yesterday’s BBC Big Questions about the existence or otherwise of heaven was recorded live, and next week’s about the press was recorded immediately afterwards. I know, as the saying goes, because I was there.

Trade Secret 2 . . the panellists and audience have a little pre recording warm up debate, (same as Question Time) in this case about the Obama visit to the UK.

It was a fairly standard and perfunctory discussion, save for one interesting observation from my fellow panellist Max Clifford who revealed that he ‘can’t stand’ David Cameron. Nicky asked him why. ‘Because he is just a PR man,’ he said.

Now the looks on the faces of some in the audience suggested that the words pot, kettle and black were crossing their minds. But the thing about Max Clifford is that he is indeed a PR man, and one of his times, in that he manages to wrap up PR, tabloid journalism, celebrity culture, exposure and privacy, crisis management in one neat go that has turned him into something of a celeb himself, complete with very white teeth and personalised number plates on a Rolls Royce waiting for him outside.

He may have had plenty of dubious clients and got up to plenty of modern media shenanigans in his time, but he has no pretensions that he might be able to be Prime Minister. And he clearly sees a lot of his own PR skills in Cameron, yet insufficient ability to be PM. His main complaint seemed to be that one day Cameron acted in pursuit of one short term media hit and the next day another one. It is a variation on a point I have been making for some years myself, related to Cameron’s lack of strategic clarity.

I suppose a Prime Ministerial Easyjet mini break to Ibiza is likely to be seen by Max as but the latest PR stunt aimed at suggesting he is something other than a rich posh toff desperate to be thought to understand ‘real people.’ Who knows? It may be that Cameron and family really really wanted to go to Ibiza, of all the places they could have chosen for a short break. But then again …

Once we got onto the press issues there were other areas where Max and I found ourselves in agreement, not least concerning the uselessness of the Press Complaints Commission, and the fear of some newspapers that if they can’t do kiss and tell, their future is in doubt. Look out too for some very telling points from a former Daily Star journalist who turned against his employers, a journalism professor on just how widespread phone-hacking may have been, and a guy from Index on Censorship pointing out the threat to the privacy of ‘ordinary people’ posed by the giant social networks.

But I think Nicky might get miffed if I give away too many secrets from the discussion we had, which can be seen this coming Sunday, so I will draw the veil there other than to say I was surprised to be in twitter conversation by the end of the day with two of the studio guests, ‘Wayne Rooney’s call girl’ Helen Wood, and Gordon Ramsey’s former mistress, Sarah Symonds. The former thanked me for treating her so nicely (which might be liable to misinterpretation if Fiona is scrolling through twitter) and the latter, whilst complaining I was ‘bombastic’ in debate, said she loved my first novel, All in the Mind, and that it made her cry.

Which brings me neatly, as you would expect, to Mark Lawson’s piece in The Guardian today, where he castigates modern leaders for not reading enough and for trying too hard (Cameron to Ibiza … Clegg to the Champions’ League Final … Gordon Brown calling Simon Cowell to inquire about Susan Boyle’s welfare…) to associate themselves with pop culture rather than ‘real’ culture. Certainly the Camerons’ books and DVD collection in the much analysed kitchen photo suggested upper low to middle brow, but I imagine there are heaving high brow bookshelves elsewhere. Surely?

Lawson does concede that modern leaders are probably a lot busier than predecessors who would sometimes take holidays running into months rather than weeks. Churchill didn’t just read books on holiday, he wrote them too, but he was a bit of a Primus inter pares of  the PIPs of all time.

Lawson concludes that we would have better leaders if they read more and got out more. Tony Blair did a fair bit of reading when he was PM, but mainly political history, and books on religion. He did also go fairly regularly to the theatre, and if it ever got into the press, it did so via the theatre or a member of the audience, rather than via us. I was always impressed too that Douglas Hurd made a point of reading even a few pages of a novel every day when he was Foreign Secretary.

It may just be natural Tory politeness but virtually every time I bump into a minister or one of their senior staff these days, they tell me they are reading my diaries, especially volume 2, Power and the People, on our first two years in office. Oh, by the way, they can pre-order volume 3 now – Power and Responsibility, out July 7. We are here to serve.

It may be, who knows, that Cameron does have a cultural hinterland we don’t yet know about. If he does, it might be an idea to let us know. Then again, to Max Clifford it would just be another PR strategy to clash with the last one. So best get on trying to govern the country, Prime Minister, read a few books if you get the time, and go to see plays and films you want to, without feeling the media have to know.

And if you want to give me a quote for the cover of volume 3, I would consider it. You’re up against stiff competition though, from Lib Dem peer and terrorism commissioner Alex Carlile — ‘Alastair Campbell’s diaries have the quality of Pepys … people will be looking for insights and finding them in 100 years’ time’. I like that one. They’re not all bad these Lib Dems.

  • Keane Sinead

    The Camerons are entitled to have a break with there children.Samuel Pepys are you sure Carlile wasn’t joking?

  • MicheleB

    I don’t share the distaste some people claim for MC. 
    Re his family life he seems a totally serious man with good priorities.  He’s not very different to a solicitor that defends what his client sees as their rights on the objective  principles, rather than admiration for the person.

    He makes a lot for doing so (in the same way Mrs Blair did for exposing loopholes that could then be closed).

    So he’s protecting the rights of ‘hostesses’, some of them need it.

  • MicheleB

    Oooops, I forgot, re PowerPoint man and his little outing, he’s not quite a Jarvis is he?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DqgXzPfAxjo

    I’ll leave the jokes about using the shortened surname to others!

  • Dave Simons

    Apart from not being particularly well-read, I don’t think the current crop of leading politicians are well-briefed. The gaff by ‘the people’s toff’ last summer about Britain being the US’s junior partner in 1940 suggests to me that the general decline in educational standards in the last few decades has not only been apparent in the state schools but in the top private schools like Eton and the leading universities like Oxford. I’ve received reports about recent appearances by Nick Clegg in Sheffield which illustrate the same point. Discussing country matters with representatives of the local Ramblers’ Association, Nick was confronted with the acronym, ‘The CROW Act’ – the Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000, brought in by the 1997-2001 Labour government. “What is the CROW Act?” asked Nick, who claims to love walking in the countryside around Sheffield where there are lots of Access signs which have been installed since the passing of the CROW Act. And last Friday night, when Nick condescended to give half an hour of his valuable time meeting local people to discuss their concerns about the NHS, he found himself easily upstaged by representatives of organisations like Friends of the Earth and Oxfam, who showed themselves to be far more articulate, informed and better-briefed than he was. No wonder he baled out after half an hour, and apparently the level of the discussion went up considerably after he’d gone.
    Does it matter? Not to them, I suspect. All that matters is that DC is Prime Minister and NC is Deputy Prime Minister, and as for sentimentalities – like ‘the national interest’ – let the plebs just talk among themselves for another four long years.

  • Robert

    I think Alex Carlile will not mind a minor correction – that your books will be providing insights in 500 years, alongside Niccolo Machiavelli’s writings of 500 years ago.

  • Olli Issakainen

    Due to my mother´s line of work, I spent my childhood inside hospital areas. After a spell as a head of nutrition at a mental hospital, she got a similar job at the nearby central hospital.
    Luckily the central hospital had its own library, and my lifelong love affair with books was born.
    One of my favourite books in the library was The Guinness Book of Records.
    And if my memory serves me right, I remember reading that the man who has read most books is Gladstone. 100,000 of them!
    People in the US do not want an intellectual as president. But I would not mind if the PM of Britain has read a few books…
    Of course, leader needs most of all decisiveness and firm judgement. But there are things which you cannot do by gut feeling. You simply have to know the facts.
    We all know from welfare reforms that David Cameron lacks a clear strategy.
    Mr Osborne has one – unfortunately it is wrong.
    Britain is having its weakest recovery from recession since the 1920s. Tory right is now calling for more cuts and also for tax cuts.
    When it comes to tax cuts, it has a point. Keynes made the case for tax cuts and infrastructure spending to boost growth and reduce unemployment.
    Britain needs pro-growth macroeconomic policies. But the return to Anglo-Saxon model will now only produce stagnation, high unemployment and even bigger public sector deficits.
    But there is no lack of clarity in Tory thinking when it comes to causing deep and lasting damage to the Labour party.
    Labour is £10m in debt. About 87% of donations comes from the unions. AC, by the way, appears to be the biggest individual donor.
    The Tory-led government is planning to impose a £50,000 cap on political donations. This, along with changing boundaries and Scottish independence, is not good news to Labour.
    A blanket right to privacy is a relatively recent phenomenon. It derives from article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights, which under the 1998 Human Rights Act was incorporated into UK law. A countervailing force in article 10 guarantees freedom of expression.
    Trial by media has become politicians´ rite of passage in Britain.
    Finally, Ed Balls in increasingly worried about the eurozone. Olli Rehn, Finnish European Commissioner for Economic and Financial Affairs, has recently spoken harsh words for Greece. Vince Cable has lost faith in Greece.
    Watch this space!

  • ambrosian

    The main respect in which senior politicians differ from most of the population is in watching hardly any television. This is one of the things that sets them apart, others being outsize egos and opinions on everything. It also gets them into trouble: condemning programmes they’ve never seen and, at the recent referendum, saying that the X Factor uses the Alternative Vote. It does not.

    I believe that Gordon Brown did enjoy watching the X Factor with his kids but many believed either that this was an invention or that he had no right to take a break from public duties. But poor Gordon was lambasted for whatever he did or didn’t do, including comparing himself to Heathcliff (he didn’t) and saying he liked the Arctic Monkeys (he didn’t say that either).
    Brown was ridiculed for holidaying in Suffolk. Yet the Cameron’s tripping in Ibiza (no pun intended) will get an easy ride in the media. My ISP has the headline “Samantha rocks Ibiza with Flower Power”. Imagine the ridiculing of Cherie Blair in similar circumstances. (I wonder if the Camerons visited Duchess Middleton’s Uncle, the one with the tattoos and interesting recreational habits?).

    PS: I’ve been watching the Parliament Channel’s re-run of 2001 Election Night today and (at the risk of looking like a creep) I have to say that you Alastair have aged much less than many others. Eric Pickles looked just slightly portly back then and not the man-mountain he is ten years later. But I suspect you do more running than Pickles and perhaps eat slightly less.

  • Richard

    Quoting Max Clifford as being anti Cameron and ory is a remarkable scoop Al!
    You have lost none of your bloodhound skills!

  • MicheleB

    OFGS that stupid button that I repeatedly scroll over.

    Has ANYbody said the family are not entitled to their break Shin?

    Doubtless they’re being accommodated some distance from with the lager louts, having an Ibiza Light experience.

    • Keane Sinead

      I understand old dear you are having difficulty deciphering between reply and like.What I wrote was called an observation,breath deeply don’t be on the attack all the time.Spain is a beautiful country,with a rich history its not just getting drunk 24/7.The article though,I have not got words.

    • Quinney

      Give over Michelle, Cameron was a Bullingdon boy.The only difference between them and lager louts is that daddy can pick up the bill when they wreck the place.

  • Anonymous

    I have to say that if it wasn’t for AC’s post, I would not have known the Camerons had gone to Ibiza.

    Acutally, that’s wrong – I just saw the front of one of the tabloids in the supermarket, focussing on what Samantha Cameron was wearing during the trip.  I think it must be a constant struggle for the Camerons to look somehow right for the country in 2011.  A plump old fogey and a county woman showing too much flesh aren’t going to cut it, I’m afraid.  

    I know that Alastair is not joined to Tony Blair at the hip, but… I recall Blair being photographed with Berlusconi and the like as he enjoyed the kind of foreign hospitality not many of us would ever experience.  He certainly didn’t use his holidays for PR stunts, or if he did they backfired, since most people took a dim view of his free holidays with questionable types.

    While I’m writing, I want to congratulate Alastair on being a generous donor to the Labour Party.  I wonder why TB, who did so well out of it, appears not to be sending any money the party’s way.

  • Ali, a wonderful piece of spin. But planting the seeds that Cameron is not well read rather flies in the face of the facts. First in PPE at Oxford and according to Vernon Bognador, was his brightest student. Nice try you old rascal!

    • KDouglas

      You can obtain degrees without being well-read.  AC is making a particular point about the anti-intellectual nature of many politicians who want to court popularity in every way possible.  

      On the subject of ‘brightness’, I’d point out that Cameron seems remarkably bad at reading any policy documents prepared by members of his cabinet… until it’s too late.

  • Chris W Drew

    Can any of David Cameron, Max Clifford or even your humble self account for the paradox that PR has such a bad image? 

  • Keane Sinead

     Cameron is far from dumb.He knew who the late great Garret Fitzgerald was,I nearly choked on my tea when I listened to his praise for him upon his death.

  • MicheleB

    The pedallo is of a very curious design

    http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/3607861/David-and-Samantha-Cameron-on-Ibiza-break.html?OTC-RSS&ATTR=News

    “Go down the slide Jnr so we can ride over you”   :-s

  • Keane Sinead

    Did you’re Mammy never teach you two very important facts.One should never use the Lords name in vain and when trying to make a point one should never use abbreviation !

  • Dave Simons

    At last I’ve learned something from one of your posts! I didn’t know Max Clifford was ‘ory’.

  • Sjt7772003

    pathetic now your reduced to quoting that creep Max Clifford. How the mighty have fallen.

  • Olli Issakainen

    Forgot to mention that Burnley should sign Mikael Forssell. Burnley has been linked with Finnish international striker this week. He scored 17 goals in 32 appearances for Birmingham in the Premier League in 2003-04. He has played 74 times for Finland scoring 24 goals. I remember him tearing our defence apart at Turf Moor when he was on loan at Crystal Palace. And a note for the lads on the CM messageboard: it was Aki Riihilahti not Mikael who made negative comments in his blog about Burnley as a town.
    I have helped a bit our local football club Jippo both on and off the field. Now Lauri Dalla Valle of Jippo is in the books of Fulham. When he was at Liverpool, the coaches said that he was more natural finisher than Michael Owen! Lauri is one of the best young players in Europe (striker), and Burnley should try to have him on loan for the next season.

  • Ehtch

    Takes a PR man to spot a PR man. Dave always tries to say the right thing, no matter what. If Dave was the Titanic Captain, he would say, while he drowns, it is still just a slight water leak not to be worried about, people.

    And I like the stuff Amando Iannucci does in political comedy for many years now – he is a genius at it, as here,
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_G0IgbVIkDM

  • Ehtch

    Takes a PR man to spot a PR man. Dave always tries to say the right thing, no matter what. If Dave was the Titanic Captain, he would say, while he drowns, it is still just a slight water leak not to be worried about, people.

    And I like the stuff Amando Iannucci does in political comedy for many years now – he is a genius at it, as here,
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_G0IgbVIkDM

  • MicheleB

    I don’t feel any need to respect what you do Shin and my Mam (that’s a Yorkshire mother) urged me to think for myself as soon as I became old enough.

    BTW, my Dad also never referred to his Irish mother as ‘Mammy’ and as this is not panto why not spare me the prescriptive suggestions?

    OMG I just used an abbreviation, catch a ‘mime’.

  • MicheleB

    I don’t feel any need to respect what you do Shin and my Mam (that’s a Yorkshire mother) urged me to think for myself as soon as I became old enough.

    BTW, my Dad also never referred to his Irish mother as ‘Mammy’ and as this is not panto why not spare me the prescriptive suggestions?

    OMG I just used an abbreviation, catch a ‘mime’.

  • MicheleB

    Quite so Quinney, I daresay some proprietors actually welcomed their arrival!

    It’s a pity the country’s ruination is beyond even their pockets.

    .

  • MicheleB

    Quite so Quinney, I daresay some proprietors actually welcomed their arrival!

    It’s a pity the country’s ruination is beyond even their pockets.

    .

  • MicheleB

    Yep Shin, it’s an eyesight problem (as well as a dislike of illogical layout ….. it being dead easy to cancel the Reply box if that’s traversed by mistake but an accidental ‘Like’ is fixed……).

    After I breathE deeply I might bother with the rest of your post but there again I …… didn ‘t.

    .

  • MicheleB

    Yep Shin, it’s an eyesight problem (as well as a dislike of illogical layout ….. it being dead easy to cancel the Reply box if that’s traversed by mistake but an accidental ‘Like’ is fixed……).

    After I breathE deeply I might bother with the rest of your post but there again I …… didn ‘t.

    .

  • MicheleB

    I’m always amazed by pseudo-certainty. 

    Or pseudos’ certainty.

    How do you know TB has not donated? 

    There’s an awful habit of guessing and proclaiming it as if known to be true; perhaps you’re a ‘reporter’?

    .

    .

  • MicheleB

    I’m always amazed by pseudo-certainty. 

    Or pseudos’ certainty.

    How do you know TB has not donated? 

    There’s an awful habit of guessing and proclaiming it as if known to be true; perhaps you’re a ‘reporter’?

    .

    .

  • Keane Sinead

    I am only joking with above comment before some people start going off the scale

  • Keane Sinead

    I am only joking with above comment before some people start going off the scale

  • Dave Simons

    You should learn how to write, Sinead. ‘Your’, not ‘you’re’ – the latter means ‘you are’. Also, with respect, you should give the Lord the benefit of an apostrophe – ‘the Lord’s name’. The use of abbreviations depends on the context – we all use them, often without knowing they are abbreviations, and what matters is whether the point being made is being understood.

  • Dave Simons

    You should learn how to write, Sinead. ‘Your’, not ‘you’re’ – the latter means ‘you are’. Also, with respect, you should give the Lord the benefit of an apostrophe – ‘the Lord’s name’. The use of abbreviations depends on the context – we all use them, often without knowing they are abbreviations, and what matters is whether the point being made is being understood.

  • Nicola

    A book Cameron really should read, but probably never will, is The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists (by Robert Tressell).  It shows the desperate poverty and precariousness of working class life was in Edwardian England.  If you had no job you starved or went in the workhouse – the threat of unemployment was used as social control.  (That idea made a comeback in the 80s.)

    The title refers to the way many of the workers in the book are complicit with the system that oppresses them. Working men had been given the vote by that time, and many supported the Tories and Liberals (whom Tressell regarded as basically the same – so no change there then).  This world is only a few generations away, and yet the poverty it describes is quite mind-blowing.  It’s a long way from the soft focus world of Downton Abbey, which is how people today imagine the Edwardian era to be.
    The book was published three years after its author died of TB, and was abridged to water down its socialist message.  Nevertheless its popularity was credited with helping to win Labour its landslide victory in 1945.

  • Nicola

    A book Cameron really should read, but probably never will, is The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists (by Robert Tressell).  It shows the desperate poverty and precariousness of working class life was in Edwardian England.  If you had no job you starved or went in the workhouse – the threat of unemployment was used as social control.  (That idea made a comeback in the 80s.)

    The title refers to the way many of the workers in the book are complicit with the system that oppresses them. Working men had been given the vote by that time, and many supported the Tories and Liberals (whom Tressell regarded as basically the same – so no change there then).  This world is only a few generations away, and yet the poverty it describes is quite mind-blowing.  It’s a long way from the soft focus world of Downton Abbey, which is how people today imagine the Edwardian era to be.
    The book was published three years after its author died of TB, and was abridged to water down its socialist message.  Nevertheless its popularity was credited with helping to win Labour its landslide victory in 1945.

  • Nicola

    This extract from The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists describes a bit of PR that Dave himself would be proud of.  Sir Graball D’Encloseland, the Member of Parliament for the borough, was one of the bitterest opponents of the halfpenny rate [a modest measure that would have helped the town’s poorest], but as he thought it was probable that there would soon be another General Election and he wanted the children’s fathers to vote for him again, he was willing to do something for them in another way. He had a ten-year-old daughter whose birthday was in that month, so the kind-hearted Baronet made arrangements to give a Tea to all the school children in the town in honour of the occasion. The tea was served in the schoolrooms and each child was presented with a gilt-edged card on which was a printed portrait of the little hostess, with ‘From your loving little friend, Honoria D’Encloseland’, in gold letters. During the evening the little girl, accompanied by Sir Graball and Lady D’Encloseland, motored round to all the schools where the tea was being consumed: the Baronet made a few remarks, and Honoria made a pretty little speech, specially learnt for the occasion, at each place, and they were loudly cheered and greatly admired in response. The enthusiasm was not confined to the boys and girls, for while the speechmaking was going on inside, a little crowd of grown-up children were gathered round outside the entrance, worshipping the motor car: and when the little party came out the crowd worshipped them also, going into imbecile ecstasies of admiration of their benevolence and their beautiful clothes.For several weeks everybody in the town was in raptures over this tea–or, rather, everybody except a miserable little minority of Socialists, who said it was bribery, an electioneering dodge, that did no real good, and who continued to clamour for a halfpenny rate.

    http://www.gutenberg.org/files/3608/3608-h/3608-h.htm

  • Nicola

    This extract from The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists describes a bit of PR that Dave himself would be proud of.  Sir Graball D’Encloseland, the Member of Parliament for the borough, was one of the bitterest opponents of the halfpenny rate [a modest measure that would have helped the town’s poorest], but as he thought it was probable that there would soon be another General Election and he wanted the children’s fathers to vote for him again, he was willing to do something for them in another way. He had a ten-year-old daughter whose birthday was in that month, so the kind-hearted Baronet made arrangements to give a Tea to all the school children in the town in honour of the occasion. The tea was served in the schoolrooms and each child was presented with a gilt-edged card on which was a printed portrait of the little hostess, with ‘From your loving little friend, Honoria D’Encloseland’, in gold letters. During the evening the little girl, accompanied by Sir Graball and Lady D’Encloseland, motored round to all the schools where the tea was being consumed: the Baronet made a few remarks, and Honoria made a pretty little speech, specially learnt for the occasion, at each place, and they were loudly cheered and greatly admired in response. The enthusiasm was not confined to the boys and girls, for while the speechmaking was going on inside, a little crowd of grown-up children were gathered round outside the entrance, worshipping the motor car: and when the little party came out the crowd worshipped them also, going into imbecile ecstasies of admiration of their benevolence and their beautiful clothes.For several weeks everybody in the town was in raptures over this tea–or, rather, everybody except a miserable little minority of Socialists, who said it was bribery, an electioneering dodge, that did no real good, and who continued to clamour for a halfpenny rate.

    http://www.gutenberg.org/files/3608/3608-h/3608-h.htm

  • MicheleB

    Cameron’s jaunt wouldn’t ever across to me as anything more than little touches to the attempted ‘Dave’ image.

    Why on earth that needed the flourish of flying Ryanair, given its owner’s behaviour last week, who knows?

    .

  • MicheleB

    FAB video 

    .

  • Keane Sinead

    That what we say in Dublin old dear.For a person who ‘alleged’ to have such perseptive knowledge about the North,I imagined that you were born there.Old dear I think you need to calm down ever so slightly.

  • Keane Sinead

    Old dear, you really should not be on the attack all the time,I am starting to feel sorry for you.Also read what is written and also read what you write,as we say in Dublin ‘chill the jets’.Aich te bheal agus slan’I doubt you understand

  • Keane Sinead

    Calm down for one,to start if you are going to address me by my forename  there is a fáda on the e.You do not begin a point with abbreviations, also I was replying on an i-pad thats my I made a spelling mistake.Also re Lord you do not use an apostrophe look it up.

  • Keane Sinead

    Listen old dear you really need to read before you reply.I understand that you have a rather limited vocabulary,also do you think old dear I have any respect for you and the views which you convey.

  • Keane Sinead

    Also is a person uses OFGS and OMG its just lazy.

  • Keane Sinéad

    Old dear is sarcasm not something which has reached you yet?

  • Keane Sinéad

    Scrap calm down want to throw keyboard for i-pad out window

  • Dave Simons

    I made reference to the same book a few blogs ago, 13th May and an earlier one. I’m always glad to see it given a plug. It is just over a hundred years since Tressell died, but the problem summed up in the first sentence of your second paragraph is as relevant today as it was then.

  • MicheleB

    I really can’t believe that very many people at all that survived right through WWII till 1945 had read the book.

    I’m sure that the incoming funds via the Marshall Plan and the ways that Labour intended to invest it in society (little ‘s’) are the reasons for their landslide victory.

    Not posted to be sour, my parents survived WWII in very differeing circumstances to each other, both were avid readers but there can’t have been many manifestos as pragmatic as 1945’s needed to be.

  • MicheleB

    Are you ‘Liking’ your own posts Bling?

    They uniformly have one stroke within minutes.

    Silly Bling-y.

  • Edwarddevenney

    AC,

    am very much enjoying your performance on ‘The Big Questions’!

    Edward Devenney

  • A McShane

    Perhaps your Mammy should have taught you the difference between your and you’re.

  • BasicTruth

    I cannot believe that you have the bare faced cheek to call Cameron a PR man. 
    Yourself, Mandelson and Blair, remodelled the Labour party into Nu Labour. Changing it, to gain election as part of a PR stunt. You then continued to be far more interested in making things look good rather than actually being good. 

    In so doing you took a principled socialist, unilateralist party with the same basic members and turned it into a media friendly party that would be electable. You spent more money than is imaginable on gov’t advertisements, leaflets and propaganda. And yet you right this tripe?

    Clifford doesn’t like Tories, because he a class reversed snob. And he idiotically thinks they are all toffs. He more or less said so on a TV Program. He was also behind the “exposure” of the Hamiltons and their subsequent arrest for sexual assault which of course proved to be a fabrication. 

    Clifford is scum. He makes money our off misery.

  • Anonymous

    Go Alistair. This is a well produced and thought out
    web site and you write fantastically well.