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Britain- an Alcocracy sitting on a Boozequake

Posted on 16 February 2012 | 4:02pm

I am very pleased that The Times pulled out my invented word – alcocracy – as one of their headings on my piece on alcohol today. Here’s hoping that it has more success than my last deliberately invented word – garbagic – in entering the language. Garbagic was a word I came up with to describe stories which were a load of rubbish, therefore many on most of the days I worked in the Downing St press office. It flickered and flared but alas, faded away.

How different for the greatest wordsmiths of all time, William Shakespeare, who invented words virtually every time he put pen to paper. Google ‘words and phrases used in Shakespeare plays’ and you’ll see what I mean.

Alcocracy is designed to convey the sheer volume and power of alcohol sales and marketing in the UK, and alongside it that fact that it is a very hard place to say No. My Panorama film on BBC 1 on Monday night, Britain’s Hidden Alcoholics, tells my own story but more importantly that of a group of middle class alcoholics who have all now become abstinent as the only way of controlling the demon drink.

One of them, Mark, said that he felt there was a tsunami of marketing, and that Britain was sitting on a boozequake. Now that’s a good word too. It hasn’t made the programme, so I put it in here.

Mark also came up with my favourite quote of the whole film … ‘I think people’s perception of what is an alcoholic is interesting because actually, do you know what, it is not the guy with the brown paper bag and the strong cider or cheap vodka. It can be two glasses a night if that is what you need. I challenge anybody I know to stop for a month, to go the same places, do the same things, interact with the same people and just remove the alcohol from the equation and see how they feel.’

I know from personal experience how hard it is to stop given the social norms and the tsunami of marketing. But the medics in my film are in no doubt that unless Brits curb their drinking to excess, the booze quake will cost tens of thousands of lives. Liver disease is the only major cause of death rising year on year, whereas there have been huge falls in mortality from smoking diseases.

And as I said here yesterday, when David Cameron was out and about lambasting binge drinking yobs, the real problem drinkers in Britain are the professional middle classes. We have embraced Europe’s drinking habits – 1.6billion bottles of wine a year – but not the eating habits to go with them, so that we now drink wine like we used to drink beer, and we combine drinking with food with weekend binging to give us what one of the medics in the film, Dr Nick Sheron, calls ‘the worst of both worlds.’

Dr Sheron says that the risk of liver disease starts at two bottles of wine a week. At that rate, it is small. But from four bottles a week, it rises exponentially, so that if you’re drinking 8-10 bottles a week, you have a good chance of liver disease. What’s more, you are unlikely to know until you’ve got it, and the damage is done.

I am, as I have said here before, very squeamish, so I surprised myself in not passing out when shown round the Department of Anatomy at Queen Mary’s Hospital by Dr Cathetine Molyneux. She showed me a diseased liver which used to belong to a heavy drinker. Twice the size of a healthy one, covered in fatty spots. The guy died of internal bleeding because the liver was so tired from breaking down alcohol that it couldn’t do it’s day job of filtering blood.

Dr Sheron revealed that he now has as many women with cirrhosis of the liver as men, and that 95 percent of his patients do their drinking at home. Here is the issue the government’s new alcohol strategy will have to look at. As you’d expect, some of the filming is done at Burnley Football Club, where alcohol sales are an important part of the club’s finances, as they are with many businesses. Catering director Chris Gibson told me that for evening events at the club, many of his customers arrive drunk, having tanked up cheap at home, so they can spend less in the bars and pubs and clubs.

So cost and availability are an issue. But so is the freedom of the individual to make his own choices. So is the decline of the pub, a paradoxical fall that comes alongside a rise in drink problems. So is the cost to the NHS, the police, and to people’s marriages and relationships It is the job of the government to weigh it all up, and decide.

A lot of the comments yesterday seemed to think Cameron’s sudden interest in the boozequake was a ploy to divert attention from rising unemployment. Possibly. But Britain’s relationship with alcohol is a troubled one, and as with any problem, the first thing you have to do is admit it.

The Times tell me they have had a huge response to my piece. In it, I state directly that the middle class Times reader is more likely to have a drink problem than the binge drinking yon. So perhaps it has struck a nerve. And though government has to set rules and regulations, and legistlate, as we did with 24 hour licensing for reasons I never fully understood, ultimately it is for all of us to make our own decisions ever time a drink comes our way. And in the alcocracy, that happens very very often.

  • Plasticine

    At least the alocracy is democratic  - the end of the two pub ‘sessions’ allowed belligerent drinkers (my dad for one) to keep drinking to oblivion during the day, the 24-hour licensing really opened up opportunities for the younger drinkers, and aggressive marketing of cheap deals made buying ‘nice’ bottles of wine the sensible financial option for those of us who drink at home. We are all in it together, we all need to admit it. In my view, castigating people rarely helps them address their misuse problems – be it with alcohol, food or smoking. Many people don’t believe they have the freedom to make their own decisions about these things – or the power to find it ( I write from my own experience). Along with price controls, punishments and health warnings there needs to come compassion and a communal desire to increase self-worth.

  • http://twitter.com/monibhachu moni bhachu

    This is Excellent!

  • Michael Brian Harrison

    You are very right and a popular theme. Amongst the rather wealthy retired that I live amongst a couple of bottles at a dinner party is very usual- and there are a lot of dinner parties. And of course amongst the party it is common to have a couple reformed booozers as you say you are. The trouble is for many of these retired it is the last remaining pleasure.

  • Anonymous

    Yes, now I’ve read your blog piece, and its all well and good as a description and partial analysis of the wider health problem – but what about how we go about changing the culture?

    Have you looked at my solution to at least one aspect – which could have massive positive knock on effects on the NHS and culture of drinking to excess?
    http://www.smileofthedecade.co.uk/newblog/?p=201

  • Anonymous

    So by that reckoning most of us are alcoholics? (Who could withstand drinks with colleagues or a family wedding without alcohol.)

    And Tony Blair was an alcoholic even though when he told John Reid how much he drunk, Reid said “In Glasgow we give more than that tae the budgie.”

    I think the only way to make this policy move 10% on a scale of 0% = mental and 100% = sensible would be to to work out how much tax will be raised by this, and reduce income tax by the same amount. That way people could be shown we are taxing your destructive drinking more and your productive work less.Of course give it two years and you can be sure it will just be a tax on top of it – we don’t do genuine tax cuts in this country, only gimmicky, temporary pretend ones from the Keynesians (even though Keynes himself said these don’t work.)

    I remain libertarian – any damage people want to do to themselves with alcohol they should be allowed to do so, any damage they do to others should be dealt with decisively.

  • Anonymous

    Topical link to alcocracy: people may have seen the Tory MP this week refusing to spend a week on benefits. Anyone seen the 2 excellent documentaries with Matthew Parris on this? In 80s he said he could live on benefits, then panorama or world in action challenged him to do so in scotswood newcastle and he couldn’t. He ended up getting sacked by Thatcher.

    Backin 2005-ish they challenged him to back to Scotswood and try again. This time he succeeded but the main thing he noticed on scotswood was:- All the teenagers were on drugs (E, marijuana etc)- All the older blokes were alcos- All the women were on antidepressants- All the kids were on ritalin

    He left the question open are governments just trying to drug these people into submission, or merely ignoring them while they do so themselves.

    Perhaps “alcocracy” needs a few additions to make it “drugocracy” or “substanceocracy” hmmm I need to leave word-creation to the pros!

  • Anonymous

    This ambulance man has a couple of ideas:
    http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2012/feb/16/give-people-a-drinking-licence
    Unlike condemlab conspiracy, as well as increasing tax on off-license alcohol he wants to reduce tax on pub alcohol.
    He also suggests a drinking licence.

  • Stella

    Hi alistair, I’m 28 and don’t drink due to health problems. I still go out a lot and enjoy bars and pubs with friends who drink. But, there is a culture shift needed as i regularly have to explain to new people why I’m not drinking and more often to bar staff! People are instantly suspicious if you don’t drink and it can be annoying.

    I also get annoyed at how much soft drinks cost in bars, but that’s another issue!

    Stella

  • sarah dodds

    Very interesting.
    I spent my years between 16 and 19 in a weird mix between utterly hung over, totally sloshed, mildly pissed or counting the hours until I next went out. Somewhere in the middle I have vague memories to do with A-levels and college or something….
    When I turned up for a night shift at the nursing home where I was working , I had always been for a quick pint before clocking on!
    I could go on for hours and painful hours about the amount I was able to drink then, the fun times I had and then the gut wrenching (literally) awful and dangerous situations I got into as a teenage girl whose alcohol consumption was dangerously high.
    And then at the age of nineteen I just stopped. I moved away from home to live by myself. I realised then that if I choked on the pewk, was too drunk to remember the night before, or was being groped by a drunk yob and/or was unable to work the next day the parental bailout was no longer on offer.
    So as quickly as I had started drinking  I stopped. Totally. I have been tea total for 21 years – coming on for pretty much half my life. I did not “see anyone” about it or anything. I did not talk it over with anyone.  I could just see all too clearly where I was heading, and it was not where I wanted to go.
    The strange thing was, and still is, that no one questioned the pisshead me or asked me to justify my choices.  
    It was when  I  chose not too drink at all that people thought I was odd, and starting asking for the justification. Weird.

  • Niamh13

    Spot on, Alastair. The problem is much the same here in Ireland. Thanks to super-strict new drink driving laws and destroyed consumer spending power, people get seriously drunk at home. Supermarkets and convenience stores sell slabs of beer for as little as 15 euro and a bottle of wine could be 3 euro!! Most middle class homes are stocked up with serious amounts of booze in storage, in fridges, garages, spare rooms, garden sheds. 

  • Beaconclaret

    Great to see this issue getting some long overdue attention. For too long we have glamourised alcohol consumption in the UK. Let’s call it by its real name: drug abuse.

  • Cara

    I concur 100% with your comments. Alcoholics are not the drunks we anticipate. They are the ordinary folk who stressed, anxious and happy reach for the bottle of wine. Professionals are the hidden boozequake and everyone needs a wake up call. I was extremely lucky to study a while in Sweden with the monopoly on alcohol…. Regulation on sales has affected the behaviour…Libertarianism versus preservation of NHS, police and care resources. Its definately time to act! I fear your programme will be rather uncomfortable viewing for alot of people. We need a new approach to addiction, mental health and alcohol. They are intertwined and a focused approach will help. There is no social divide with alcohol. It really is an alocracy!

  • Anonymous

    Question time:
    “Clowns to the left of me”

    Owen Jones – heart in the right place. Spectacularly ignorant.John Prescott and him “We need more demand, thats why Obama has run a stimulus and it has worked.” Fact: Obama has cut overall spending, coalition has increased it. Private sector recovery in US, none in UK. This stuff isn’t rocket science folks. Prescott then ends by saying “but this lot av borrowed more anyway” – thank you John that saves me from defeating your argument.

    “Jokers to the right”

    Julie Meyer – if you lose your job start your own business. Well done Julie, it took a lot to make prescott and jones look smart but you achieved it.

    “Here I am, stuck in the middle with you.”

    Owen Jones correct to rail against slave labour though ie the governments forced work programme.

  • Anonymous

    One beautiful part of this alcohol argument. All parties say raising the price of alcohol will reduce demand for it. All agreed?

    Good. So by that logic what would reducing the price of alcohol do then? Increase demand of course.

    Hence, Keynesians are wrong, supply siders are right. To increase demand, reduce price.

    A big thanks to all the “useful idiots” muhahahah! Next time you jump on a bandwagon remember “Trust, but verify.”

  • Michele

     I always understood M Parris to have resigned for the sake of the party (he was about to be outed for being gay wasn’t he?).

    I doubt he’d have given that as his reason if he’d been sacked  in the circumstances you describe (if your post does mean it was due to him espousing about benefits).

  • Michele

     Whatever has got worse since 24hr licensing became possible (ever exploited?) the end of a ‘universal’ closing time has improved a lot of things – not least getting home on public transport which, hopefully most drinkers would.

  • Michele

    Liver damage is a horrible way to go and few transplants are available for hardened drinkers.  Pancreas damage following T2 diabetes is so hard to find that by the time it is it’s nearly always terminal and awful to see.

  • Michele

     I doubt T Blair actually ever became what we understand as an alcoholic; he took a couple of spirits before dinner and half a bottle of wine with it …. he was right to question whether he should let it increase so I doubt he did (or that he took that amount every night).

    There’s a little too much fun been had in the right wing papers about him being an alcoholic (based on his own worrying that he was heading that way).

  • Anonymous

    For Michele and co regarding e-petitions I’ve just realised how easy it is having discovered this link (and quote) on twitter re the workfare programme which I consider the worst policy in the UK I’ve seen in my lifetime. No left winger or right winger could support this:

    https://submissions.epetitions.direct.gov.uk/petitions/29356
    “If slavery is not wrong, nothing is wrong.” Abraham Lincoln

  • sarah dodds

    As a liberal lefty I agree in theory, but your thinking leaves one issue unresolved. What about the social cost in terms of health, policing, lost days at work, not to mention the emotional cost to families of the trauma involved?

    • reaguns

      I know what you mean Sarah, the question is should the 80% or 95% or whatever it is of us who don’t have issues with alcohol have to pay for the abuses of those who do? I am not sure of the answer, or even my own opinion. I prefer not to have a controlling nanny state, prefer us to be allowed to drink what we want as long as we don’t damage other people with violence and vandalism. But we do have an NHS so we get damaged financially by people who damage themselves with alcohol. Also perhaps alcoholism is a disease like any other and the NHS is insurance like any other whereby we all pay knowing that most will not crash, but some will and we pay for them… knowing it could be us or our family too.

      I think though if the majority have to pay more tax on alcohol for the minority who abuse it, then they should expect something in return either a corresponding tax cut in other areas (successfully done by Australia with vat) or some form of sanctions against those who abuse alcohol, in the same way we all pay for car insurance but we expect other drivers to maintain their cars, wear seatbelts etc. 

  • Dave Simons

    ‘I remain libertarian – any damage people want to do to themselves with
    alcohol they should be allowed to do so, any damage they do to others
    should be dealt with decisively.’

    Can’t agree with the first part. We’re all paying via the NHS for the damage people want to do to themselves. Can I just add that a lot of medical professionals who advise people not to exceed 16 or 21 units per day set a good example by their own levels of alcohol consumption.

    • reaguns

      I know, there are downsides either way, I just personally feel, just about, the downsides of more tax, more control, more expense outweigh the others. I’m not as clear on it as I am on some issues though.

      Not sure if you are joking or serious or not about the medical professionals! I know the student doctors and nurses I mixed with occasionally in uni times used to like to tie one on!

  • Ehtch

    Some people just do not want to stop, they feel as if they cannot function in a modern world without it, even so much as to feel “if it makes me ill, and will be an early end to me, so be it”. Harsh words I know, but I believe it is fact. Had a relative die recently of mainly liver failure, but OK, he was in his mid-seventies, but he was boozing everyday in his last years of life, but his last year of life was a nightmare for everyone around, his mind was totally gone because his liver was packing up, releasing toxins in his blood making his mind unstable, abdomen blew up like a balloon, needing it drained every now and then.

    There are a lot of people that cannot cope with life pressures, and they will find something to numb themselves. In times past, social disease like TB and cholera used to play on the mind, and those that were left felt lucky to be still alive from something more or less not in their control, but that isn’t so these days so much. Booze and drugs seems to be replacing those diseases, as if it is the swings and roundabouts of life in action.

  • Suesanford15

    Thank you so much for this article. As a middle aged, middle class professional woman who quit drinking almost a year ago, because I know I can’t do moderation long term it makes so much sense and yet it doesn’t get discussed. Tell people you want to stop smoking and everyone applauds and offers help, tell them you want to stop drinking and its a very different reaction indeed.  I went to my GP to ask for some support when I’d made the decision to do something about it, she had no idea what to do with me, told me I was the first person who’d ever self referred to her and treated me as though I’d just told her I beat my children. Fortunately the support services I was eventually put in touch with were absolutely brilliant.

  • Mark Wright

    As an entertainer, and a very light drinker, I witness week after week the inability of people to enjoy themselves unless they’ve ‘had a few’. People have at times rather stayed at home and not come to a gig if they have been unable to drink (they have to drive or whatever) as, and I quote, “There’s no point if I can’t have a drink.” Are we really so uptight as a nation?

    Couple this mentality with the fact that we in the UK, despite more relaxed drinking hours, are still hardwired into the 11pm closing time. We drink at the same rate, except now we do it for longer rather than spreading our consumption throughout the night.

    So, yes, cheap alcohol has certainly exacerbated the problem, but the problem goes far deeper than this. What is it about our culture that requires us to have downed several glasses of wine before we can consider ourselves as to be having a ‘good time’.

    And are we so stressed and so on edge that the only way to even start to relax and unwind is by artificial, external assistance? 

    I look forward to watching your programme on Monday.

  • Ehtch

    Maybe the school authorities should introduce a qualification called Boozology – maybe best at GCSE level, get them while they’re young and impressionable, just before they enter Boozeland.

    Are you listening Gove? This is what is called actual imaginative thinking, see, Govey boy.

  • Anonymous

    I’m not sure, I didn’t follow such things at the time, wiki is not much use, says the doc happened in 1984 and that Parris said he came out in a late nights commons debate but no one noticed. The programme spun it that he had been forced to leave due to the embarassment from the show, but I’m not sure.

  • Ehtch

    Since it didn’t/didna work oot/out that Alastair posted an interesting piece of music from Brighton (maybe because he thought I was their agent or something, which I am not, I thank you, just good friends), anyway, they tells us we are an island in an island, which makes sense to me, at least, especially what is going on well oop north. If we are one country, why do we play sport as four “nations” apart from athletics, and Olympics? And don’t get me started on “England” crickers, quite mad in it’s name. Quite all over the place it is, and hope Rangers sort their bother with the english HMRC – quite a co-incidence, some conspiracy theorists would say, ey? Anyway, Brighton and Katsen, who I have heard is up to other things these days, hope Alastair posts this – been trying for months, but I know, I am trying, at times, mostly,
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IM6RNEaca2Q

    Red. white and blue.

  • Anonymous

    For the record I don’t consider Tony Blair an alcoholic at all, I personally don’t see the problem with a couple of drinks to ease the strain of being pm. Seemed to work ok for Churchill.

  • Ehtch

    anyway, furthermore, I just about remember when England when they toured in cricket were called MCC when they ‘visited’, so as not to upset the local colonials, that were transported, used and abused over times. Fell out of fashion in about 1970, didn’t it? Or did I make it up in last night’s dream? Think not.

  • Ehtch

    A question – what with what is happening in Europe at the moment re. money, are the US, the tennagers they are in historical world life, looking for answers from us in Europe, and set us up to find that answer, that they think twentieth century type capitalism is at it’s dysfunctional end. Just a thought. Communication is barking mad good these days, isn’t it New England types?

  • reaguns

    Reasonably good piece in the Telegraph by tory David Ruffley saying we need a banking inquiry, don’t let him steal your thunder AC:
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/financialcrisis/9086451/The-lynch-mob-is-still-baying-for-bankers-blood.html

    He talks about closing credit ratings agencies down, AC got to like that!

    He also talks about the inquiry the Americans held, not the Reagan one for S&L which Alastair and Gillian Tett mentioned, but the FCIC one this time.

    Its worth mentioning that both left and right in America called this a total whitewash. The people who predicted the crash, such as sometime Obama advisor Nouriel Roubini and Ron Paul advisor Peter Schiff have been scathing of this inquiry. They felt they and others who wrote books predicting the crash should have been consulted rather than the tame insiders who were actually used.

    It would be like David Cameron holding a “smugness” inquiry and then getting Chris Huhne and Nick Clegg to run it.

  • Ehtch

    still think S4C’s coverage should be watched by all scots, no matter how watered down it is, by language,
    http://www.s4c.co.uk/clic/e_level2.shtml?series_id=502921770

    Mae e yn ecspiro yn dau digwydd/expires in two days, Alastair.

  • Anonymous

    Oh dear.  The middle class person reaches for the bottle of wine.  Guilty.

  • Ehtch

    By the way Alastair, Gavin Henson, yes him, is playing tonight at centre for the Cardiff Blues, available on your BBC2 Wales channel selection, way down on the SlyFox selection from space, as I no doubt you have got. Might be available online, UK only, maybe,
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/rugby-union/

    Ah yes, see it will be, kick-off ten or so minutes. Go Gav!

  • Ehtch

    You grizzled faced englishmen, our taffy baby-faced assassins are coming to take your daughters away from you, week tommorow, in your posh twickers – come and chase after us with your shiney turbo-charged Range Rovers will you,
    http://www.youtube.com/user/ToughMudder?v=8mef13L6moU
     
    Alright, butt, calm down, have her back then, sell her into slavery then will you….

  • Michele

     You’re confusing ‘demand’ with ‘available to spend’ and when someone goes out to buy a 12-pack and finds they’re on at the hypermarket as a loss leader at 2for1 they’ll get two packs.

    The outcome is they will drink 24 cans instead of 12 in less time than they would have otherwise, if paying for all 24 cans.

  • Dave Simons

     Sorry – I meant ‘per week’!

  • Ehtch

    Watching Greece again on Newsnight – say again, how do you cope with people going from fantasy to honest true reality?

    Anyway, Portugal, Fado music, for no doubt a song for Greece – looks like we will be licking the streets soon too, the way things are going, Fado,
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q3L6kNQCkzo

  • Anonymous
  • reaguns

    I don’t think I’m confusing demand at all unless you are talking semantics ie when I said “increasing demand”.
    They had the “demand” for 24 cans but were not able or willing to buy them at the normal price, once the price reduced they had. I suppose a better demonstration would be if they got the second 12 at half price and still bought them.

    Its spinning jenny stuff… reduce price of textiles… end up with more jobs in textiles.

  • reaguns

    Dunno if my last reply posted or not, basically saying I don’t believe I am confusing demand.

  • Michele

     I am not talking semantics, are you?

    After I’d despatched that post I realised I’d not gone heavy enough anyway.  I’m sure a lot of people would like to buy six-packs at the supermarket.  Remember them?  They were day-to-day enough to have inspired an easy  compliment for fit blokes.  Anyway, this person that might like beer in a six-pack is now almost forced to buy a 12 but on arriving at the supermarket sees they’re on at two packs for the price of one.

    I think that in addition to my suggestion a couple of days ago that the tax being paid on each alcoholic purchase should be displayed I’d not mind knowing how markdowns are being recouped.

    Maybe it’s because other goods (more worthwhile?) are being price-hiked.

    Something called SFMD (supplier-funded markdown) prevails in a lot of retail, this is when big buyers forces a supplier to fund their promotion (or quite often it’s used when a buyer has over-bought and needs to shift stuff pdq and ‘help’ is ‘requested’ for their mistake!).

  • Paddy

    Looking forward to the BBC programme tomorrow night – Thank you for what you said and shared at the Toranfield NEAR conference in Ireland last November.The drinks industry must come to the table with responsible responses to what is rapidly becomming the greatest marketing driven epedimic of the 21st century. Supernormal profits are no longer the acceptable norms in a society that is expected to pay such a high price for the shareholder value in the drinks industry. As an alcoholic in recovery for over 30 years now, I am neither anti drink nor against all that is good about our pub culture but an industry that does not promote the safety consumprion levels of its products for( alcoholics which is ZERO) and normal over 18 drinkers (21/14 units per week for males/females) is indeed dinosauric,(not sure this word exists but hopefully gets accross the status of the drinks industry in modern society<
       

  • Anonymous

    Yes tax displayed would be good, showing markdowns would be good but I think if implemented for alcohol would have to implemented elsewhere and all the tricks of supermarkets exposed!

    Re demand semantics: When supermarkets decrease the price of alcohol I’ll buy more. If govt increases the price of it I’ll buy less. This is at least half this topic yes, buying less? (Combined with more tax on whats bought.)

    So I’m saying that people who recognise that increasing the price will reduce demand (as Cameron and Alastair seem to) automatically must believe the converse is true also ie reducing price will increase demand.

    And so they are advocating supply side economics, even though neither Cameron nor Campbell would know supply side economics from a hole in the ground.  

  • https://twitter.com/fr3kysnail Fr3kySnail

    Panorama #BritainsHiddenAlcoholics on BBC1 Monday 20/2/2012, 2030 gmt.

    I once dated a secret hidden alcaholic, whose alcaholism stooped to so mega lows.

    If someone has a covert drinking problem, the first thing you should expect is a web of lies. The whole nature of this underworld is nothing is at it seems.

    The hidden alcaholic always try to remain ahead of the curve. In her case, it was bottles of vodka hidden in the laundry basket, in shoe boxes, etc. You learn to be adept.

    Vodka, is an effective alcahol to consume secretly. It has a low smell threshold. Her tells were plentiful; It’s amazing how difficult it is to read someone determined to fool you.

    Their goal is to fake it, and you are the test dummy. I would watch her eyes for glazing, speech for a heavy tongue, swaying walk, instant sleepiness. You begin to make your own tests.

    That was the light of the moon, the dark side consisted of black outs,aggressive moods, almighty crashes,alco-depression, urinated clothing, bedding, sofas, Drinking at work, getting lost on transport system, sleeping around.

    #BritainsHiddenAlcoholics have the ability to deflect, to make YOU feel guilty, aka offloading. They seldom take full responsibility. Perfect example is #boozedUPbird Denise Welch.

    I take this platform to forewarn, to help, to assist, to support. Do not become the victim. Learn to recognise these signals. Reach out, it can be an emotional toll – non alcaholics need support too.

    I await with intrigue to see what this program delivers; 30 minutes is too short. Plus Alastair’s broadcasting ego. I have tweeted hourly tweets, plugging Panorama series 60 episode 6 on twitter using #BritainsHiddenAlcoholics
    Or click http://bit.ly/wH22Bp

    https://twitter.com/fr3kysnail

  • Gilliebc

    Good link reaguns.  It is said, in fact I believe it is well documented that Hillary Clinton is a great admirer of the late eugenicist (and all round evil bitch) Margaret Sanger.

    There is but a thin veneer of outward respectability and compassion about those who hold positions of power and influence in this world and if they decided to depopulate using the exuse/reason that society cannot afford to look after the less than perfect it would be all to easy for them to persuade the people that this would be a sensible plan given our current economic woes.  Television in particular has an enormous influence on the populace and is easily manipulated by those in power to persuade people that black is white and vice versa.

    Watch out in the near future for the BBC to begin the process of convincing the people that paedophilia is perfectly normal!
    No, I’m not joking.  Not all people will be manipulated and fooled of course.  But a large percentage will be.

  • https://twitter.com/fr3kysnail Fr3kySnail

    Panorama #BritainsHiddenAlcoholics on BBC1 Monday 20/2/2012, 2030 gmt.

    I once dated a secret hidden alcaholic, whose alcaholism stooped to so mega lows.

    If someone has a covert drinking problem, the first thing you should expect is a web of lies. The whole nature of this underworld is nothing is at it seems.

    The hidden alcaholic always try to remain ahead of the curve. In her case, it was bottles of vodka hidden in the laundry basket, in shoe boxes, etc. You learn to be adept.

    Vodka, is an effective alcahol to consume secretly. It has a low smell threshold. Her tells were plentiful; It’s amazing how difficult it is to read someone determined to fool you.

    Their goal is to fake it, and you are the test dummy. I would watch her eyes for glazing, speech for a heavy tongue, swaying walk, instant sleepiness. You begin to make your own tests.

    That was the light of the moon, the dark side consisted of black outs,aggressive moods, almighty crashes,alco-depression, urinated clothing, bedding, sofas, Drinking at work, getting lost on transport system, sleeping around.

    #BritainsHiddenAlcoholics have the ability to deflect, to make YOU feel guilty, aka offloading. They seldom take full responsibility. Perfect example is #boozedUPbird Denise Welch.

    I take this platform to forewarn, to help, to assist, to support. Do not become the victim. Learn to recognise these signals. Reach out, it can be an emotional toll – non alcaholics need support too.

    I await with intrigue to see what this program delivers; 30 minutes is too short. Plus Alastair’s broadcasting ego. I have tweeted hourly tweets, plugging Panorama series 60 episode 6 on twitter using #BritainsHiddenAlcoholics
    Or click http://bit.ly/wH22Bp

    https://twitter.com/fr3kysnail

  • reaguns

    Hi Gilliebc I dunnor about your bbc story, but agree with the rest of your post – this is why this argument about eugenics must never be forgotten before “depopulation” policies get imposed on us just as they’ve already been imposed in some countries.

  • Potatocake

    there is no such thing as queen mary’s hospital, we are barts and the london!! 

  • Gilliebc

    I agree reaguns that we must remain vigilant regarding eugenics and other issues also.
    It will be interesting to see just how the BBC and most of the rest of the MSM set about persuading most of the populace that paedos are not the evil perverts most right-thinking people believe them to be. 
    I suspect it could well begin with the discovery of a rogue gene or something in these perves over which they have no control!  There is a reason why many of us believe this will happen and it is because there is a very high proportion of peados among TPTB.  Indeed some argue that paedophillia (and satanism) is the glue that holds these ultra wealthy and powerful people together. Remember the Dunblane school massacre?  A huge cover up went on after that incident that involved some of the highest of the high in public life and the police force.

    At the risk of sounding over-dramatic this world is in the control of very evil people e.g.
    no one gets to be President in the US unless they have the ‘blessing’ of the powers that be.
    The same also applies to leaders of our own main political parties.  I thought for a shortwhile that EM was his own man.  But others say differently.

  • reaguns

    What’s your sources for that sort of stuff though Gilliebc? I have found that most conspiracy theories I have heard about have tended not to be real when examined closely, or sometimes they cover up or distract from bad things that definitely are going on such as my bugbears inflation and workfare.

    Have you ever heard of a book called “Voodoo histories?”