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Strategy is God – this and other lessons learned from sport and elsewhere

Posted on 4 July 2012 | 7:07am

I have been a bit snowed under, and travelling, in the last few days, so apologies to anyone who came on here and found a short and rather tired blog on why David Cameron was avoiding having an inquiry into the banks.

However, by popular demand (i.e one person who read it whilst perusing the internet and suggested I put it on here, I offer you a piece on leadership and strategy that I wrote for the Portland Quarterly, a publication from the PR and strategy company for which I work part-time. And if you get to the bottom of the page, there is an interesting piece on the Tories and polling to be found by going onto the next page, signposted bottom right.


  • reaguns

    Like the article on leadership.

    I didn’t like Alastair saying that politicians know about leadership but business people haven’t grasped this yet. The problem is that so many of them do think they have grasped this and think leadership is about schmoozing staff and customers, communication etc, and they leave out the actual leadership, ie making decisions! In other words they would think good leadership would be Bob Diamond successfully talking his way out of this libor thing. In reality good leadership would have been stopping the practice from occurring, or, lets be honest, stopping it being found out.

    This is addressed somewhat in reference to Cameron, I appreciate AC’s point that a leader with clear goals who doesn’t communicate well may struggle, but I’ve seen plenty of good communicators without the clear goals – like, as he says, Cameron.

    I appreciate Alastairs point about how would the great war leaders do today under 24/7 scrutiny. Well I think 24/7 scrutiny by the Sun and the Guardian would be a tad easier than 24/7 scrutiny by the 3rd Reich for one thing! But other than that, I think that Roosevelt and Churchill would be elected and re-elected in absolute landslides where they around today. Imagine how Roosevelt would deal with the financial crisis, and with the bankers? Imagine how Churchill would deal with those looking to hug hoodies and protect the Al Qaeda members?

    Roosevelt would have to adjust to some economic truths that have emerged since his time, and Churchill would have to adjust to Britain no longer being a superpower, but I’m sure they’d manage just fine.

    Liked the rest of the article. Strategy is God? Except Alastair Campbell does do strategy!

  • reaguns

    According to the rumour mill, Alastair has been spending the past few days advising Bob Diamond! He has refuted this on twitter though, and can’t believe it myself! Would he consider doing this if approached by the likes of Diamond? I can only imagine a re-run of the scene from Liar Liar when Jim Carrey is asked if he can give some advice to a persistently offending client. Ie Alastair’s PA would hold the phone and say “Can you give some advice to a Mr Diamond?” Alastair says “Sure”, grabs the phone and says “Stop breaking the law asshole!”

  • reaguns

    In reference to an earlier blog on Armando Ianucci, and all those on twitter who said Ianucci was oh so cool and Alastair so yesterday… well… Veep is lame so far. Should have made another Thick of It instead.

  • Anonymous

    I think ‘Strategy is God’ is cringeworthy, and just the sort of thing a bright young PR executive would utter.  As for leadership, everybody knows that all you need for that, at least in some organisations, is an MBA.  

    As someone once said, in this country the class system has been reproduced in management hierarchies.  Neither involves any merit, but both thrive on quite a lot of bullshit.When AC does get a minute I’m sure he’ll want to comment on the Conservatives’ attempt to frame the last Labour government for all the ills of the City.  Come on, that has to be this week’s news.

  • Dave Simons

    ‘First, they must possess a strong vision’.
    Yes but we’ve had a few strong visions which we could perhaps have managed without. The Third Reich was a strong vision and Hitler would probably have ticked all the boxes on leadership. Ditto Margaret Thatcher – her strong leadership was based on an incredible degree of narrow-mindedness and an almost Manichean one-sidedness and it has led us to where we are now. Her vision was of a capitalism freed from the constraints put on it by organised labour – trade unions, nationalised industries and Welfare State. ‘Every man a man of property’, every man a small, medium or large  businessman. She wanted to turn the clock back to the early Victorian age, and her success was based on a collective loss of memory of why trade unions, nationalisation and the Welfare State came into existence in the first place. A strong vision may be a necessity for leadership, but it does matter what the strong vision is.

  • ambrosian

    The new series of Thick Of It will be shown in the autumn, I’m assuming on BBC. Filming is finished and it is currently being edited.

  • Anonymous

    Snowed under in July? Leaves on the rails a la British rail? Jesus Christ Alastair, just say what you have been actually up to, that is all we want to here, no amateur dramatics of your day.
     
    like, for instance, me and scots rugger player Whiskers and myself found we lost a female friend when young, so we shared, and this is the song I suggested to him, for the ladies we lost in our young life, female friends, that it is hard to get over, thinking, could I have done more, and, was it me that made her go down that road. Me and Whiskers were being just young lads, that is all. Anyway, the song I suggested, to get over it. He lost a female friend to HIV sleeping around at fifteen, and I from someone that starved herself to death with anorexia, her heart gave up going to see her relatives in a flight to Italy. The song, wha could have been for totally beautiful both, heartbreaking is not the word, friend,
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L8XQZYIiNgo

  • Anonymous

    Really?! Great news! I knew they had a new one planned (based on coalition politics I believe) but did not know they had went ahead with it. So far I think The Thick Of It is light years ahead of Veep. Hope the new one matches up, and I think it will.

    You watching Veep?

  • Dave Simons

     Ehtch, I don’t know which was worse – being reminded of Simon Dee or hearing that damned song again, with its cringe-making line, ‘I want to look into your head’! Eden Kane’s brother, Peter Sarstedt, was doing a failed imitation of ‘Another Side of Bob Dylan’ five years on – there were a lot about in those days, including Jonathan King’s ‘Everyone’s Gone to the Moon’ and later the ‘Come Up and See Me’ song by Cockney Rebel’s front man, Steve Harley. I’d love to know what Sophia Loren thought about Sarstedt’s song, with its ‘back street in Naples’! However, referring to a previous post, I have heard of Iolo Morganwg – I think he gets a mention in George Borrow’s ‘Wild Wales’. He did for Wales what James MacPherson did for Scotland – they both forged ahead in the revival of their respective literatures.
    Anyway, how does your reply relate to my post? I’ve tried lateral thinking, but blimey!

  • Dave Simons

     Thanks KDouglas – I enjoyed that like a double malt!

  • Dave Simons

    Contemporaries – especially ex-service people, didn’t elect Churchill in 1945. Presumably they knew things which subsequent mythology and hagiography has airbrushed out. Churchill wasn’t the only opponent of appeasement – even Michael Foot was anti. Does Foot get any credit for it? Churchill certainly does. And he didn’t fight the Nazis single-handed. One of his closest aristocratic friends was giving away secrets to the Japanese, useful for the fall of Singapore and the bombing of Pearl Harbour. Did Churchill have his friend put on trial? No. Was Churchill anti-fascism? Like hell he was – he supported the fascists in Greece. Mind you I like what I’ve seen of Churchill’s art work and he was very generous in his appreciation of Trotsky’s ‘History of the Russian Revolution’. But let’s not continually churn out this Winnie the Great Leader stuff – leave it to the Goves and Thatchers.
    Churchill would never win an election in today’s climate.

  • ambrosian

    No, because I don’t get Sky Atlantic. It’s not on Virgin TV. Why are so many British comedians taking their stuff to Sky Atlantic, including so-called Murdoch-haters like Steve Coogan? Money, I suppose. Hypocrites, all of them. Others include Russell Brand, Kathy Burke and Jack Dee.

  • reaguns

    That’s a good point actually – coogan on before veep, surely that is a jimmy Carr scale industrial grade hypocrisy.

  • reaguns

    I agree with some of that, not all. I think Churchill would be a clear thinking, straight talking, populist, non pr, non politically correct breath of fresh air. He would have a lot of to my mind unpleasant opinions, but alas opinions shared by a large majority in this country, I think we can guess what he’d make of windfarms, state supported single mothers with 6 kids, immigration, eu taking sovereignty before we even get into hug a hoodie and burglars sueing people for cuts they got burgling their houses. My god the more I think of it, a landslide he’d win.
    Doesn’t mean he’d be good, even Tories recognise his many disastrous non ww2 interventions.
    He lost in 45 sure but look at the calibre of the man he was against. Attlee would win easy today as well I think – and what a pleasure it would be to see substance beat style.

    Finally, of course Churchill wasn’t the only one against appeasement, though he was one of the first to suggest crippling the fledgling german war machine. You are right he spoke in favour of fascists when it suited.

    And he did not win the war. His speeches did not win the war. The men firing and dodging and taking the bullets won it. All I’d say is that Churchill had faced bullets before himself so was a more appropriate war leader than Blair or bush or whoever.

  • Gilliebc

    Well said Dave.  The Churchill myth/lie is one of the best examples of how the people of this country and the wider world have been mass manipulated into believing what they TPTB would have us believe.   
     Not everyone (by a long way) fell for the official version. which was why he was soundly rejected by the electorate in 1945. Yet such is the power of the MSM the myth still continues. 

    The same as the myth i.e. official versions of 9/11 and 7/7.  AC can edit out this last bit if he so chooses.  However the MSM do a very good job of portraying truth seekers as conspiracy nut jobs, so that the majority of the people are still happy enough to go along with what the MSM and the BBC in particular tells them to believe! People are waking up big time to the BBC’s agenda.  It is after all the state’s official broadcaster.  Manipulation by the state and for the state. 

  • Gilliebc

    I just posted a reply to you Dave.  Half-way through I lost it (the post, not the plot) so it may not come up ‘in reply’ my fault, not the fault of Disqus!

  • Anna

    There is a difference between leadership and management. Diligence, vision and strategy are essential management skills, but true leadership is about personal relationships: courage in leading from the front and taking your team with you; loyalty to your team – praising them for their successes and taking the flak for them when they mess up; and inspiration – winning hearts and minds, particularly of those at the bottom of the ladder. For these leadership qualities, look no farther than my hero Admiral Lord Nelson who had the qualities of a superb manager and leader in spades. He was a master of battle tactics, innovative and brave; a brilliant administrator,and a  a dogged, indefatigable enemy. His officers knew that he would give them their head in risk taking,and  make sure they got praise and promotion if they were successfu;l and cover for them if they weren’t. The lower deck knew he had their welfare at heart, battling constantly for better conditions, good food, humane treatment. (Returning some shoddy clothing to the Admiralty, he fumed that ‘the contractor should be hanged that would send such stuff to my poor sailors’.  He knew every man by name and after a successful action, went down to the gun decks and thanked each man personally, shaking him by the hand. He fought for proper pensions, proper care when they were sick, protection for their families. This inspired leadership that stemmed from respect and concern for those under him built up the reserves of loyalty that made heroes of ordinary men. And when he died, ‘men that fought like the devil sat down and cried like a wench.’
    That’s a true  leader.

  • Michele

    Savings before strategy – the description I’ve just heard re the latest round of shredding of Army regiments.

    Which daft sods will serve this Govt’s agenda by joining the TA to supplement reduced numbers of regular soldiers?

    I’m wondering which drugs Dave and Osbo are on.

  • reaguns

    Thought I would comment to say I agree, seeing as we never seem to!

  • Anonymous

    I no doubt was talking some sort of lateral thinking rubbish, with a sinuous connection to the thread, as I have a habit of. But have no idea what it was now. That was yesterday.

    Anyway, with the amateur dramatics that went on in the H of C today, if I never thought it before, I certainly do now, that George Osborne is a complete and utter shit. How can he use the banking crisis for cheap party political points? Is he an idiot? The man’s a fool.

    He no doubt is saying to The City “Carry on chaps, business as usual”. Good grief almighty!

    Wished Balls had dragged Georgie Porgie out to the lawn outside and giving him a good mark one original kicking, in the conkers especially.

  • Anonymous

    Just to spook you out more, Truman Capote being interviwed on american telly, being butted in by Groucho Marx constantly – you just can make it up with regards to americana, Dave. Wished Groucho died earlier.

    Tuman gives his secrets on writing, inbetween that jew trying to fuck him, but I think, maybe not in the ass,
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mFAWdvloFlE

    Since Alastair is freebasing, letting us send this blog where we want, this is my effort. Hope it is appreciated.

  • Ehtch

    Aren’t RAE Farnborough, or whatever it is called these days, going a bit over the top in rain seeding to keep the Olympics dry at the end of this month?
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-18722054
     
    Just to say, this, watch the weather over the Olympics, say no more, nudge-nudge, wink-wink…

  • Michele

     I think the most humungous examples of hypocrisy are the  omissions from the series (I’m not sure whether it’s confined to BBC4 or shown on other/s of their channels?).

    I don’t think I have things wrong:-
    Andrew Gilligan was a BBC R4 employee or contractee.
    He was employed under BBC/R4’s Rod Liddle.
    He allowed another Beeb consultant – Susan Watts – to be under suspicion for days on end.
    Because of him Greg Dyke also had to resign …. but hey …. something good had to come out of it all !
    Because of AG’s slapdash spouting without notes or script our hourly news headlines on all Beeb channels at home and all over the World Service were headlined every hour for weeks on end about ‘sexed up dossiers’.

    Because of him a shabby opportunistic piece of grandstanding smartrrrrrs cruelty was pitched at Dr Kelly at the Select Committee (the man had already been cast adrift by his superiors).

    Iannucci chose the easy option, joined in with a populist gangbang.
    Nobody wanted war, most of us didn’t exploit the fact that one happened despite that (and wouldn’t have even if given the chance to make loadsamoney).
    I think we should know the size of his profit from it all and whether altruism had anything to do with its use?

  • Michele

     I have the same dislike of Sky.  My very high part of London is surrounded by many lovely old woods but broadband has always been very unreliable via BT wires or Virgin cables but I’ve resisted a dish = Sky = Murdoch.

    Would I be a conduit for Sky money if I was a public person?  Perhaps so, seeing it  as the only way to get some balance on his stations.

  • Michele

     We don’t know what many of the recipients of compo do with it, some surely goes straight to charity?

    There is already a formal / Govt-funded compensation scheme for victims of crime.
    Arrangements that get made in the name of ‘damages’ are usually intended as punishment but it’s unlikely Murdoch felt even a flinch about the amounts awarded to his organisation’s victims.

    It’s all becoming distasteful (says she, never having had the dilemna of being offered a few mill for hurt feelings).
    Exploitation of the dead is something else and my stomach is churning at the mo at the spectacle of the ‘loving family’ that survive Ian Tomlinson.  The poor man’s poor father discovered first knowledge of his son’s death two days later by reading his name and seeing his picture in the papers.

  • Anonymous

    This from today’s Independent:

    ‘Barclays enlisted Tony Blair’s former adviser Tim Allan to help deal with the crisis engulfing the bank over the Libor interest rate-fixing scandal.’Mr Allan, the founder of Portland Communications, had been hired on a “corporate reputation” brief at Barclays but has now been pulled in to provide advice on handling the fall out from the £290m fines imposed as a result of the scandal.’Does this mean that Mammon is in fact the god we need to be talking about?

  • Michele

     While it’s true that the young man called Tim might have an MBA (and unfortunately they have become the currency worldwide for all those not planning political careers) that doesn’t make his arithmetic wrong.  

    We use other short sharp summaries about strategy or lack of it (or of being organised) – all being at 6s or 7s, left hand doesn’t know …. etc and unfortunately A A Milne’s opinion about one of the advantages of being disorganised (which I too often put my own faith in) wouldn’t really stand up as a plan where others’ livelihoods depend on more than nice surprises.

    Elsewhere on thread someone is being dissed for being a drunk as well as a strategist.  Far rather such a drunk for nowadays rather than the ‘chillaxed’ incompetent and sidekick that we have as the country’s two main representatives now.

    PS: A friend got one of the earliest MBAs c/o UCLA …. I always thought it must have been a bought commodity !!

  • Anonymous

    Wow, I’d noticed on Alastair’s twitter feed that he was doing a “prebuttal” of claims that he was assisting Barclays with PR. I believed that. But it turns out that Portland are assisting Barclays, and of course AC works for Portland. I can’t imagine he wouldn’t have been asked for his opinion and therefore be helping, at least in a roundabout way, Bob Diamond with his publicity. See my post below though.

    Doesn’t look like Diamond is following a very Campbell type strategy at the minute however, I’ve seen him make two disastrous statements so far. Then again maybe Campbell’s advice was “Resign.”

  • Anonymous

    I don’t know what you mean by the omissions from the series… from Coogans, or from Veep / The Thick of It?

    I don’t really follow the gilligan/bbc thing either, as I never really followed gilligan or bbc news at the time, or since.

    As for Ianucci’s war motives, I believe he probably was genuinely against it, though he may have been persuaded that way by the sort of media we have, I am not sure it could be said that he has earned money out of it per se?

  • Gilliebc

    Be careful Ehtch or you’ll be labelled a nut-job conspiracy theorist!  Not by me I hasten to add. As it happens I was reading a post elsewhere earlier today that reckoned the Lynton and Lynmouth flood disaster in the early part of the 1950’s was caused by RAF cloud seeding experiments.  

    It seems to me there is a bit too much experimenting going on with the weather.  I sometimes wonder if the Boscastle flood a few years ago was entirely a natural occurence.  It will be interesting to see what the weather’s like for the Olympics.

  • Janiete

    Speaking of Andrew Gilligan, it seems he hasn’t learnt a great deal from the days of his infamous ill-judged comments on the Today programme.

    I heard him on Skypapers a few months ago say he saw nothing wrong with journalists paying policemen for stories.

  • Janiete

    ‘George Osborne is a complete and utter shit.’
    I couldn’t agree more. Clearly Osborne and Cameron are cut from the same cloth. Both are prepared to use ANY tactics to damage opponents if they think it will help distract attention from their own inadequacies. And by God, they are inadequate! 

  • Michele

     The ‘admissions’ would be those instances for which the BBC (via its happless shabby ‘correspondent’) is responsible.  For it and for Iannucci to be riding on the back of Gilligan and profiting from his miserable disorganised inefficiency is like something by Kafka (although I’m sure DS might  suggest a more approprate surrealist).

    Unchecked slobber was put out at 6am and repeated endlessly for weeks on end, sounding like some NI rag.  The Beeb got rid of several Today team members but it has never admitted the extent of its responsibility in even employing someone stupid enough to appear live on an appointed interview but with no notes and grasping at thin air for his script and to fill the slot.

  • Michele

     ‘Iannucci’s war motives’ …  Eh? 
    What the ….?

    However, his willingness to choose to believe (or pretend to believe) in a drunk’s choice of words, to sustain this ‘belief’ (LOL) for all these years and to exploit it as a cheap rebuttal on OBE day …. he needs to grow some you know whats and be able to take a tease as well as throw crap.  Do you not see such cheap exploitation  as viciousness?

  • Michele

     Awwww ,,,, sweet.
    When I like I just Like 🙂

  • Gilliebc

    That was a heartfelt comment Janiete, with which I entirely agree btw. Many right-wing commentators are writing that Osborne should be focusing on his job rather than lowering the tone in the schoolboy way that he did by attacking Ed Balls. It’s been interesting to see also over the past few days that even many of the ordinary right-wing commenters have been pretty restrained in their comments too. I think it’s safe to say that Cameron, Osborne et al are definitely not liked out there, whatever peoples political persuasions are.  Along with the bankers of course.

  • Michele

     Why the apparent need to always find human intervention?

    Valley of the Rocks is amazing, the planet’s millions of years old, worn and torn.  Let Physics be and take credit for itself for heaven’s sake !

    PS: The man-made but water-powered lift up the cliff joining L&L is fun though :-).

  • Michele

     I just peeked and saw someone admonishing him about his ‘decades’ since British players won at Wimbledon and naming three examples  – two of whom retired 15+yrs ago and the other 20+
    :-s

    I find twitter bizarre … but then so is posting!

  • Anonymous

    Don’t worry Gilliebc, if you notice a few of my recent posts, I have found a new hobby – creating urban myths. Well, that is what the internet is really for, isn’t it?

    Whether I am having any success, it is too early to say yet. And then I’ll bring a book out on the most successful one, should be a best seller. I have big hopes on this rainfall one.

  • Anonymous

    The beeb were wetting themselves over this Higgs boson particle last week, and seeing newreaders being asked to wet themselves over it when announcing it on telly was quite funny. They won’t know a Higgs if it came to dinner at their houses, such is deepest London being so far away from true sharp end science.

    Anyway, that is what I observed, non-Higgs boson…
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-18702455

    Like to show their daughters a Huw boson though, but that is another matter. : )

  • Anonymous

    Suppose I should say the affect it had on me, met the mother of my daughter, and when I kissed her and hugged and held her, I felt the ribs too much, and it came all back. So I got to know this lady, playing my games, to get her fed up, out of her inner mind stare. I got her back to healthy creation, things here I never ever told her. But what thanks did I get, when when eventually said, get the fuck oh here.

    do dah dah do dahh dahh day.

    Anyway, song for Ashley, with it turned out, too much irrational Derry City blood in her from her mother, drives her men to such,

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gYG8OA2nYzI

    And what thanks to I get for all this? I will tell you, feck all. I suppose that is what being A Man is all about, I fecking suppose… And I loved her, by the way.

  • Anonymous

    Ah but you see I don’t really know how that works as I never really like what anyone else says.

  • Anonymous

    Yeah I didn’t really understand that tennis thing? As far as I know he is right it is decades, and many decades, since a british player has won mens or womens titles at Wimbledon?! And I presumed the quibble was from someone who mistakenly thought that anyone cares about the doubles events!

  • Anonymous

    I saw it as defensiveness. And also, unfortunately, he has that smugness that comes from one who knows they are debating with you in front of an audience already on their side, like an eco warrior on question time.

  • Dave Simons

     Hope you’re escaping the floods down in Ottery!

  • Gilliebc

    It’s very odd that, i.e. ‘the need to always find human intervention’.  I think (for what it’s worth) that some humans think they are more important in the grand scheme of things than they really are.  The myth/scam of ‘man-made’ global warming for example, which thankfully has been shot to pieces now and has been exposed for the con that it is.  
    Planet earth goes on changing in the same way it always has, regardless of any human intervention one way or another. Or, even no intervention at all.     

    Another factor maybe is that many people don’t seem to believe in ‘coincidence’ any more.  I vaguely remember some so-called experts pontificating some years ago that there was no such thing as coincidence!  I also remember thinking that’s daft.  Over the years I have witnessed and experienced many many instances of pure coincidence.  Surely most of us have ?   

    Finally, I would venture to suggest that it suits the PTB to have us plebs thinking and believing that they have much more power than they really do!

  • Gilliebc

    And yet you haven’t ‘liked’ the actual post!    

    How do I know this?  Go figure.

  • Gilliebc

    That sounds like a plan Ehtch.  Everyone needs a hobby 🙂

  • Michele

     Ah but doesn’t it depend who one thinks the PTBs are?

    At Watersmeet, Lynmouth, think about how many more times throughout history the place has been flooded by nature, all by its humungous great self.  Perhaps the fact that there are now so few buildings around the area so-named is due to it having happened quite often (not to mention the landslides)?

  • Michele

    Doubles are great fun, ralleys are so fast and there’s less of the oh-so boring slam serve spoiling.

  • Anonymous

    Oh yeah I know they are fun, just don’t have the… gravitas or whatever its called that the singles have. This is where I fail the media / soap opera type test, I enjoy the sport of the doubles but because I don’t know the characters, follow the story as well I end up never watching them.

  • Gilliebc

    Yeah we’re quite close to Ottery, but for us so far so good.  Although one of the houses directly opposite us had their garage badly flooded.  Problem with the drains I think. 

    Poor old Ottery have been flooded so many times in the past, but on this occasion as I understand it, their new flood-prevention measures have saved a lot of properties from the flood water, but not all of them.   

    The river in our area is of course very high, but thanks to the ‘flood gates’ they installed back in the 1970’s I think, after several bad flooding incidents in the town back then and before, the town has been relatively safe since then. To give the local council some credit they are diligent about keeping the river mouth well dredged and clear where the river flows into the sea and also at the ford in our village which used to get flooded quite often at the same time.
    We are personally fortunate that we are a little higher up from the river, but I believe we could be at risk from the other direction i.e. the ‘b’ road and the steep hill behind it/us.  So fingers crossed.  The water continues to pour out from the hills for quite a long time after the actual rain storm.

  • Anonymous

    I can see the title now, it has just come to me, a few seconds ago – “How Britain kept the Olympics Dry – an exclusive”. And it will have nothing to do with Canada nor booze for arab visitors.

  • Anonymous

    We all should know, Michele, humankind can’t keep their sticky fingers off anything these days, and Mother Nature is no exception.

    Just wait for Mother Nature to turn around and give us a good smack on our botties, and then who will be crying?

  • Gilliebc

    That’s true Ehtch.  You probably know from your time in the RAF about cloud-seeding. They can’t leave anything alone. Mother Nature will give them and us such a smack in the face,sooner or later.

    Do you know much or anything about Haarp technology or chemtrails Ehtch?  I’m keeping an open mind on these issues for now.  But like many others I would like to know ‘What in the world are they spraying us with’.

  • Michele

     Yes but my question was about a specific example about two towns, above and below a huge cliff, where two rivers meet as well as numerous streams, where in other centuries there have been massive landslides and rockfalls.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lynmouth

    I just don’t see shadows everywhere nor want to or …. yawn ….. work more sensible hours!

  • Anonymous

    oh jezzus you are like a jew keeping on about the nazzies. So he, they totally fucked up, but come on, let bygones be bygones, Michele>

    So they fucked up bigstyle in their silver iodide experiments on clouds. No excuse for them to do it now to keep the Olympics dry, is there Michele?

    : ))

    Hope it pisses down, when the Queen opens it, in hopefully an Indian, monsoon, and good enough for them, those english weather tried changing shites!!

  • Anonymous

    Things have moved on Gillebc.

    Anyone remember rainseeding before the last Olympics in China? There was a big fuss about it by western powers. Seems they are quite now quiet, for some reason, as is what is going on now.

    Just watch folks, you will see next to no rain over The David Cameron’s Olympics, when he shows his pink durex shiney head every day, taking the wind out of brit athletes who have gave fecking hell in sharp end training to be up there, and then Dave turns up, butt made of lard, talking absolute patronising blind shit.

    As soon as Murray saw him courtside the other day, in Wimbs final the otherday, he no doubt thought, fuck this for a game of soldiers, get me out of here. I am not going to try and win this with him about, hoping to grab my wind from my sails.

    FUCK OFF DC!

  • Anonymous

    matter? get it? Ach, I am wasting my time with these thick London bubble livers. When they are told their underground train is going to be ten minutes late, I saw that far away look in their eyes before they managed to work out  what time that would be. Pathetic creatures. But it was a laugh, seeing people that think they are so clever finding out that they are not, before they then re-entered self-denial life.

  • Gilliebc

    They are not even hiding the fact that it is the ‘Zion’ Olympics. As Olli pointed out. 
    This torch carrying rubbish was the Nazis idea. First done in 1936.
    I mean WTF? and what’s with the one-eyed mascot! It’s all so blatent.

  • Michele

    Calm yourself fgs (and when comparing me to others try not to insult them – rather than me – by default).
    I could blather on about your blathering on and on endlessly and pointlessly about southerners and London and the English but won’t bother.
    Am about to leave for a trip that got postponed last month rolled in with the next one up … have a good summer.

  • Michele

    Strategy re sport ??
    I wonder whether that’s what Anton Ferdinand thought he was using when he made his belated allegations?

    His claim this week, words to the effect of not having wanted things to go this far, he’d only wanted to get John Terry in hot water with the FA, beggar belief.

  • jim

    Think i’ll give that a miss,I’ve still got the will to live